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"Spiked" wins FTOPS II Main Event

20 November 2006

"Spiked" took home the second Full Tilt Online Poker Series II (FTOPS) Main Event, defeating a field of 2,449 No-Limit Hold'em players for a $224,634 first place prize.

It took a little more than eight hours to reach a final table, but once the nine were set, the action was fast and furious, reaching a conclusion in one hour's time.

"Spiked" entered the final table as an patient, average-sized stack, and watched as his aggressive opponents moved quickly to the rail. In his decisive hand, "Spiked" called an all-in attempt by the very aggressive "The_D_RY." "Spiked" was a huge favorite with his pocket Kings over A-9 and his hand held, giving him a $1 million pot and a lead he would never relinquish.

The most recognized player at the final table was "CaseyTheKid," winner of the best all-around-player in FTOPS I last August. "CaseyTheKid," whose avatar is the official FTOPS Best All-Around Player Gold Jersey, won $27,000 in FTOPS 1 Event # 3. "CaseyTheKid" was the topic of discussion for the many observers watching the Main Event final tables.

The most common question was who is "CaseyTheKid?" Is he a famous pro, or just a very good online player? The question was never answered. "CaseyTheKid" never spoke the rail and was the first player bounced from the final table.

He received $17,143 and will remain one of the leaders on the all-time FTOPS leader board.

Although "CaseyTheKid" was the big name, the day belonged to "Spiked" and tournament runner-up "dmkai3."

"dmkai3" entered the final table with more than $1 million in chips, second only to CaseyTheKid." He was able to parlay that start into a heads-up finish, mostly by avoiding the multiple all-in re-raises that punctuated the final hour.

The final duo played nearly three dozen hands, but "Spiked" entered heads-up play as a 6-to-1 chip leader and "dmkai3" was never able to overcome the deficit.

At one point, "dmkai3" asked for support. "Spiked," thinking his short-stacked opponent wanted to deal, said he was willing to talk. "dmkai3" said he wanted no deal and play resumed. He was asking for support because his mouse batteries were running low and he wanted to be able to pause the tournament if the situation worsened.

Six hands later, "Spiked" moved all-in with A-10 and was called after a small deliberation. "dmkai" flipped over a Q-4 and received no help from the community cards.

"dmkai3" earned $137,878 for finishing second.

FTOPS II Main Event Notes

The Pros

Besides the large prize pools, the biggest FTOPS attraction is the willingness of the Full Tilt professionals to play in the events.

None of the FTOPS II tournaments drew more professional participation than the main event, thanks mostly to the guaranteed $1 million prize pool.

Participating in this tournament was Eric Froelich, John Juanda, Erick Lindgren, Keith Sexton, Berry Johnston, Stuart Patterson, Carlos Mortensen, Mike Matusow, David Chui, Steve Brecher, Jeff Madsen, Rafe Furst, Lynette Chan, and Huck Seed.

Sexton was the last Full Tilt professional to fall from the Main Event. With $200,000 in chips remaining, Sexton twice moved all-in, once with A-Q and once with pocket Jacks. Both times he was called with pocket eights and both times his opponent flopped a set. He finished 30th, good enough for a $3,795 prize.

Johnston was the only other professional to finish in the money. He won $795 for finishing 277th.

The Rail Birds

While Full Tilt is famous for the number of observers who watch high-stakes cash games and big-time tournaments, Sunday night's Main Event saw an extraordinary amount of observers, with many of the final observers coming to cheer their friends and family towards victory.

The scrolling observer chat got so intense, many of the final-20 participants began asking how to mute the distracting and often trash-talking observers from their computer screens. As soon as the question was asked, dozens of observers responded at the same time with a few saying that observer chat can often be helpful.

In one memorable exchange, observer "Kalgon" bet observer "thekidmagician" $5 that his friend "Sircall" would outlast "smizmiatch." The bet was made after "thekidmagician" began taunting "Sircall" for a play he had made.

"Sircall" ended up finishing 158th, much farther than "smizmiatch." Apparently, the wager was paid in full with "Kalgon" thanking his opponent for making good on the wager.


Mucking McLane
"Spiked" wins FTOPS II Main Event is republished from Online.CasinoCity.com.
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Best of Ryan McLane
Ryan McLane

Ryan McLane was a poker reporter for Casino City. Although he has a strong background in reporting, the same can't be said for his poker skills. He has never won a major tournament nor is he a professional player. He applied for this job thinking it was a joke, only to find it out that it's true, people will pay you to write about poker. His favorite word is ridiculous.

After receiving his BA in History from Stonehill College in Easton, MA, he somehow ended up freelance reporting for a couple years before being deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom III with the Massachusetts National Guard. He's back now and is a strong advocate of the phrase "God Bless America."

Currently, Ryan lives in Boston and occasionally makes international treks to cover tournament poker and news. Feature writing is his passion and there is no need to ask for his opinion, he'll probably offer it first - free of charge.
Ryan McLane
Ryan McLane was a poker reporter for Casino City. Although he has a strong background in reporting, the same can't be said for his poker skills. He has never won a major tournament nor is he a professional player. He applied for this job thinking it was a joke, only to find it out that it's true, people will pay you to write about poker. His favorite word is ridiculous.

After receiving his BA in History from Stonehill College in Easton, MA, he somehow ended up freelance reporting for a couple years before being deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom III with the Massachusetts National Guard. He's back now and is a strong advocate of the phrase "God Bless America."

Currently, Ryan lives in Boston and occasionally makes international treks to cover tournament poker and news. Feature writing is his passion and there is no need to ask for his opinion, he'll probably offer it first - free of charge.