CasinoCityTimes.com

Gurus
News
Newsletter
Author Home Author Archives Author Books Send to a Friend Search Articles Subscribe
Stay informed with the
NEW Casino City Times newsletter!
Newsletter Signup
Stay informed with the
NEW Casino City Times newsletter!
Related Links
Related News
Recent Articles
Best of Ryan McLane

Gaming Guru

author's picture
 

Elimination Hands from the 2006 WSOP Main Event Final Table

10 August 2006

These are the elimination hands from the 2006 World Series of Poker (WSOP) Main Event Final Table. Eventual winner Jamie Gold eliminated seven of his eight opponents. The only player who wasn't eliminated by the 2006 WSOP Main Event Champion was Doug Kim. He was busted by second-place finisher Paul Wasicka.

2nd Place - Paul Wasicka

On the final hand of the 2006 WSOP Main Event, Paul Wasicka raised $1.5 million pre-flop and Gold called. The flop came Q-8-5 and Wasicka made the obligatory continuation bet.

Gold immediately moved all-in, stood up, and basically begged Wasicka to call. After a long time in the think tank, Wasicka made the call showing a pair of Tens. Gold flipped up Q-9 and began to celebrate.

Wasicka played well, but didn't have much of a chance in head's up play, going into the final portion a 7-1 one chip-underdog. It took less than a dozen hands of heads-up play to crown the champion.
PRIZE MONEY: $6,102,499

3rd Place – Michael Binger

Daniel Negreanu's "dark horse pick" lasted longer than he should have, surviving several all-in bets to get as high as $14 million chips, but he ran into the Jamie "The Eliminator" Gold and was sent to the rail in third place.

In his elimination hand, Binger raised the pot $1.5 million after both Gold and Wasicka limped into the hand. The flop came 10-6-5. Wasicka bet, Binger bet $3.5 million, and Gold went all-in. Wasicka mucked the hand and Binger called.

Binger showed A-10 for top pair, but Gold had a 3-4 for an open-ended straight-draw. The turn was a Seven and Binger was drawing dead to the river. On a side note, the river was a spade, meaning Wasicka folded the best hand with his 8-9 of spades.
PRIZE MONEY: $4,123,310

4th Place – Allen Cunningham

It just wasn't Cunningham's day. Early in the tournament, Cunningham made a set of Nines when the flop produced a pair of them. He slow played the hand, making value bets on the turn and the river, only to be out kicked by Jamie Gold who also held a Nine.

Short stacked and in danger of getting blinded out, Cunningham moved all-in with a pair of Tens. After a long deliberation, Gold called the bet and flipped up K-J suited. The King came right on the flop and Cunningham was not able to find one of the remaining Tens in the deck.

Visibly distraught, Cunningham conducted his ESPN interview, then left the building, refusing to talk to the media at his elimination press conference. Radio announcer Daniel Negreanu, who is a close personal friend of Cunningham's, left his Sirius Radio broadcast to go console his friend.
PRIZE MONEY: $3,628,513

5th Place – Rhett Butler

Whether it was a cold run of cards of just his strategy from the beginning, Butler did not play many pots at the final table and eventually worked himself out of the tournament.

On his final hand, Butler saw Cunningham raise the pot and Gold call. With pocket Fours, Butler moved all-in and both players before him called the bet.

The flop came J-6-5. Cunningham and Gold checked. The turn was a two of clubs. Gold bet $2 million and Cunningham folded leaving just the all-in Butler against the chip leader. The river was a blank. Gold showed down K-J and eliminated his fourth competitor of this final table.
PRIZE MONEY: $3,216,182

6th - Richard Lee

The man who didn't really care about the WSOP Main Event prize money gambled with his second place stack against chip leader Jamie Gold and paid the price.

Coming into the pot with a raise, Lee faced a re-raise from Gold who had position. Thinking Gold was weak, Lee went all-in and Gold called immediately. Lee had pocket Jacks and was dominated by Gold's pocket Queens.

The board was no help to Lee, who went from second place to out of the tournament in a single hand. That was the third elimination by Gold, the second in which he defeated an opponent with pocket Queens.

"Jamie (Gold) was raising a lot of pots," Lee said. "I've been watching him play for three days now and the cards have been running all over him. I didn't think he had a giant hand, maybe A-k or pocket Tens. I made a decision to win the pot right there. When you're gambling at this level you're not going to get a million opportunities so when you think you have one, I think you need to go for it."
PRIZE MONEY: $2,803,851

7th Place – Doug Kim

The youngest player at the Main Event Final Table saw his starting stack of $6.7 slowly dwindle until he faced his Main Event demise at the hands of Paul Wasicka.

The 22-year old Doug Kim, an amateur from Martsdale, NY called Wasicka's pre-flop raise with pocket nines, then got all his money in on a board of 3-3-4. Wasicka had Q-Q and two cards later, Kim was eliminated in seventh place.

"I was calling to see a good board I could push with my nines," said the well spoken Kim at his press conference. "When it came 3-3-4, both our plays were automatic."

Amazingly, this is Kim's first cash in a live tournament ever. He said he's unsure where his poker career with go from here because he has a good job waiting for him at home.

PRIZE MONEY: $2,391,520

8th Place – Erik Friberg

Part of the Swedish invasion, the 23-year old online professional Erik Friberg came into the final table with a decent $9.6 million stack, but was unable to use his strong poker abilities to survive for more than a few hours.

Looking down at a pair of Jacks, Friberg limped into the pot, then re-raised Gold's raise. Gold quickly called and proudly flipped his Q-Q. An uneventful board saw Friberg eliminated in eighth place.

"I tried to get my money in their somehow," Friberg said during his post-play press conference. "I am obviously very disappointed right now."
PRIZE MONEY: $1,979,189

9th Place – Dan Nassif

The first player eliminated at the 2006 World Series of Poker Main Event Final Table was 33-year old Dan Nassif from St. Louis, Missouri. Before play started, Nassif said he needed to double early to survive. He got his chance when he looked down and saw A-k, but chip leader Jamie Gold called his raise and flopped a set of twos on a board of 2-3-5. Nassif moved all-in and Gold quickly called. Nassif got a little help with an Ace on the turn, but was unable to catch up to Gold's set.
PRIZE MONEY: $1,566,858

Mucking McLane
Elimination Hands from the 2006 WSOP Main Event Final Table is republished from CasinoVendors.com.
Related Links
Related News
Recent Articles
Best of Ryan McLane
Ryan McLane

Ryan McLane was a poker reporter for Casino City. Although he has a strong background in reporting, the same can't be said for his poker skills. He has never won a major tournament nor is he a professional player. He applied for this job thinking it was a joke, only to find it out that it's true, people will pay you to write about poker. His favorite word is ridiculous.

After receiving his BA in History from Stonehill College in Easton, MA, he somehow ended up freelance reporting for a couple years before being deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom III with the Massachusetts National Guard. He's back now and is a strong advocate of the phrase "God Bless America."

Currently, Ryan lives in Boston and occasionally makes international treks to cover tournament poker and news. Feature writing is his passion and there is no need to ask for his opinion, he'll probably offer it first - free of charge.
Ryan McLane
Ryan McLane was a poker reporter for Casino City. Although he has a strong background in reporting, the same can't be said for his poker skills. He has never won a major tournament nor is he a professional player. He applied for this job thinking it was a joke, only to find it out that it's true, people will pay you to write about poker. His favorite word is ridiculous.

After receiving his BA in History from Stonehill College in Easton, MA, he somehow ended up freelance reporting for a couple years before being deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom III with the Massachusetts National Guard. He's back now and is a strong advocate of the phrase "God Bless America."

Currently, Ryan lives in Boston and occasionally makes international treks to cover tournament poker and news. Feature writing is his passion and there is no need to ask for his opinion, he'll probably offer it first - free of charge.